Marking the Moments of President Obama

An Open Letter to the 44th POTUS


Dear President Obama,

Like so many Americans and others across the globe, I was captivated by your 2004 speech at the Democratic National Convention. Before we all knew it, you were sweeping headlines and appearing on the national stage as the future of the American Democratic Party.

The African-American community immediately claimed you as their own while Africans were quick to remind folks you also partially belonged to them because of your Kenyan heritage. For me, I was simply intrigued by your personal story and charismatic demeanor.  When you announced your candidacy for the highest office in America, I became a fanatic. Studying your policies and believing in your optimism for a reformed America.

I stood in line for 3 hours to cast my vote for you but not nearly as long as the 12 hours I held in freezing conditions on Pennsylvania Avenue as you waved at me and my group of friends during the parade. I'm proud to say that I was one of the 1.8 million in the crowd.

The night you were elected for the first time; I split my evening between happy hour on U Street and watched the final results with my good friends Rose and Susanna at Rose's apartment in Mt. Vernon over Trader Joes' vegetarian pizza and white wine. After the announcement, I called my parents in Michigan and wept over the phone. Our excitement couldn't be contained in that apartment, the roars of the crowd of supporters in DC, taunted us to join the celebration. So we ran from the apartment in spitting rain conditions with no coats nor umbrellas to Adams Morgan where we danced and cheered until 2 am. What a great time to be a Washingtonian!


I wish I had a photo to capture that moment with Rose and Susanna

Tameka, Edtience, and me on Election Night 2008 at Happy Hour on U Street.

Tameka, Edtience, and me on Election Night 2008 at Happy Hour on U Street.

The next morning I would pay for my actions as I sniffled, spoke with a hoarse voice, and could barely keep my eyes open to complete the work day. I had to confess to my supervisor about my actions the night before.

Although I voted for you twice, I didn't always agree with all of your decisions especially when it came to foreign policy. However, I respected your leadership and what you were up against with a congress that obstructed all your efforts to make a better America. In spite of the challenges you managed to pass legislation and implement changes that has advanced the country.



Early Voting with my grandparents, October 2012 in Maryland. RIP to my grandpa.

Early Voting with my grandparents, October 2012 in Maryland. RIP to my grandpa.

Me wearing the Obama pin that i wore when he won in 2008. I wore it again for his 2012 re-election.

Me wearing the Obama pin that i wore when he won in 2008. I wore it again for his 2012 re-election.

Newspapers I collected after Obama's historical wins. Picture taken the day after Obama won his second term November, 2012.

Newspapers I collected after Obama's historical wins. Picture taken the day after Obama won his second term November, 2012.


Together you and First Lady Michelle Obama made the White House "The People's House" by opening the doors to a diverse groups of Americans.


Highlights of Obama's Best Speeches


President Obama, I am forever grateful for the sacrifices you and your family have made for the American people-- most of the sacrifices we will never really know. I can't wait to see and hopefully become apart of your next initatives. Throughout the years I have prayed for the personal saftey of you, your family, and the nation.

Thank you for introducing us to your extraordinary wife Michelle Obama and holding the seat of the presidency with such class, dignity, and respect. Historians will debate your legacy for decades to come but to me, your presidency will forever mark special moments in my life.

Farewell President Obama.

With great sadness and admiration,

xoxo,

Chantal V